Breaking Out The Pentatonic - Pt 5

Lesson 5: Chromatic Scale

Breaking out of the pentatonic boxes doesn’t mean that you have to totally change the way you play guitar and start all over again, in fact, it’s very much the opposite! It simply means that you use your pentatonic knowledge as the foundation to build a more varied library of ideas.

In this lesson we look at applying the chromatic scale to the minor pentatonic scale. The chromatic scale is playing all 12 available notes, one by one, back to back! As you can probably guess, this isn’t the most beautiful sound out there and kind of sounds like the first thing a 5 year old does when they first pick up a guitar! However, in the right context, chromatics can sound great! Have a look at this diagram: 

In this fretboard we show the A minor pentatonic shape 1 with a few chromatic notes on the top two strings. The pentatonic notes are our safety notes, and the chromatic notes work out as ‘out notes or ‘tension notes’ that can be quickly resolved to the pentatonic notes. This is a good example of how to take a chromatic scale and break it into small, effective chunks. Have some fun with these ideas over any backing track, and you’ll quickly get the idea and be able to apply this to your own solos!

More about Your Guitar Academy!

Your Guitar Academy is the UK’s central hub for learning guitar. They offer an online subscription-based range guitar lessons called “YGA Pro”, as well as private guitar tuition in several parts of the UK including London. They welcome students of all ages and abilities looking to learn and improve, from complete beginners to experienced players. They’d love to hear from you!

From tone chaser to employee... Part 1.

I started out as a pedal addict from the time I started playing guitar at age 14, listening to Mike Einziger of Incubus, and his massive pedalboard made me intrigued at the number of sounds someone could produce just clicking on a little box on the floor. The pedal addiction lasted on through the years, starting with cheap pedals and slowly upgrading over time. I loved how with a relatively cheap (compared to amps or guitars) investment could radically change my sound on the fly. My first introduction into the boutique world was a modified Boss TR-2 tremolo from Robert Keeley. Getting that pedal made me realize that there were more choices out there than the standard Digitech, Boss, Electro Harmonix’s of the world. This lead to a spiral and me driving my girlfriend (now wife) crazy.

I learned about Wampler in early 2010 when I was on a hardcore Brad Paisley kick, dedicating all of my free time to learning his guitar tricks and solos. I stumbled on a thread from TDPRI that said something about a Paisley signature overdrive, and I immediately looked up the website. It was going to be a few months before its release, but I literally checked back to the Wampler site every day for months hoping to glean some more information on the tones it could produce and what features it had. I decided to go the Christmas route and ask for it from my Wife, who again is very patient with my pedal addiction. The minute I plugged into the Paisley Drive I fell in love. It was precisely what I had been looking for, and it covered way more than just Brad’s tone. At the time I was playing through a Marshall AVT150 or through a Hot Rod Deluxe. I found with the Hot Rod Deluxe paired with the Paisley Drive that I could get closer to the tone I was looking for, and quickly moved on from the AVT150. That was the tipping point for a long relationship with Wampler that is still ongoing today.

As mentioned above, I was highly active on TDPRI (the Telecaster forum) at the time, and somehow or another I made a cheesy graphic that expressed my love for the Paisley Drive, and I was recommending it to everyone under the sun because it was just my end-all be-all favorite OD. I received a message from someone, and at the time I didn’t know it was Jason Wilding, head marketing and graphics guy for Wampler Pedals asking what my favorite parts of the Paisley Drive were, and discussing graphics and all other sorts of nonsense. It turns out that the Paisley Drive was his first graphic design for Wampler, so there was a kindred connection metaphorically because the Paisley Drive was both our first introduction to Wampler and what created our friendship.  We chatted back and forth pretty regularly, and eventually became friends on Facebook a few weeks later. We talked occasionally, and he quickly became my source of GAS for all things Wampler. After getting the Paisley Drive, I had to get the Faux Analog Echo (come on, BP was using one!). After that came the Pinnacle and the Ego Compressor. The addiction just grew from there, and any spare money I had would be diverted to getting whatever new Wampler was coming out at the time, or one that I hadn’t acquired yet. The best way to describe it was that Brian was creating pedals that produced the tone that I heard in my head, and the controls were easy to dial in and self-explanatory, so I could find a useable tone within seconds of plugging in.

I became a true addict, eventually having an all-Wampler board, and still waiting and lusting for the next release. I frequented TDPRI still, and discovered The Gear Page in late 2011, early 2012. That’s what did it for me. I went into a trading and flipping frenzy that was borderline insane, at one point having one pedal going out and another coming in on the same day. I enjoyed the flipping and learning about each pedal and the trends brands took and what tonal secrets were enclosed in each box. My wife and I had just had a new baby, so time was limited playing so I spent most of my time learning and reading TGP and the ins-and-outs of various pedals. What worked, what doesn’t work. How pedal X was similar or different than pedal Y. I was on dialysis at that time (20+ years total, long story for another day). Essentially I had 5 hours of dedicated time where I was tied to a machine with needles in my arm that prevented playing guitar, so the next best thing was learning and absorbing everything pedal and amp related. I would scour the web for hours just reading and absorbing everything I could find. During this whole time however, I still maintained my love of Wampler, and I was the first person to suggest one of Brian’s pedals to any thread I could contribute to. Over time I got to know Jason better and even talked to Brian some on Facebook messenger, along with making friends with some Wampler artists along the way. My intent was that if I couldn’t work for them (only a faraway dream at the time) that I’d do everything I could to help and facilitate building the brand that I love so much.

Fast-forward to April 15th of 2014, my life changed more than words can express. That morning as I was heading out for work I received the call that there was a deceased donor that arrived at the hospital and and his kidney was the closest match they could find after me being on the transplant list for 14 years (and having 2 previous kidney transplants). I got the call, we dropped what we were doing and rushed to the hospital. Within 24 hours I had a brand new kidney, and I had been given a new medicine designed to treat my blood disease specifically (which to this day, has proven it works). April 17th of 2014 was my last dialysis to date. I preface this because it was the start of a shift in life towards the positive in every way.

Starting in late 2014, I had contacted Brian about a “Wampler Fan Club” on Instagram, and luckily he was open to the idea. I started posting pictures of players pedalboards featuring Wampler gear, basic GAS-inducing stuff that came to mind and just overall showcasing my love of the brand. During this time Brad Paisley had received a lo-fi delay prototype (The Wheelhouse) that I saw on Facebook and other social media outlets along with The Gear Page, and of course I bugged Jason to death with questions, including trying to bribe and bargain and being a general pain in the ass. I finally got the hint that it was still a prototype and that Brian wasn’t a fan of giving out protos because he prefers the pedal going to the players to be perfect. Luckily Jason had a tremendous amount of patience and knew I was just an over-excited tonechaser with a tendency towards addiction, haha. I continued growing the “Wampler Pedals Street Team” fan club Instagram account, and was attempting to coordinate with Jason to help the best I could (learning later on the other side that it was a double-edged sword, more on that later).

On my birthday in April, I woke up that morning and my wife had a surprise for me, and had my 3 year old little boy bring me a box. I had been asking for a Clarksdale (after having one and foolishly lending it out to someone and never getting it back) and I thought that’s what was waiting inside. The outer box looked familiar, and as soon as I opened it that familiar white cardboard box was staring me in the face. At the same time my wife pulled out her phone and started filming me opening the box, and I had no idea what was going on. I was shaking and nervous as could be (I have a love/hate relationship with surprises). I opened it up and lo and behold it was my very own personalized Lo-Fi delay, identical to the one custom made just for Brad Paisley, with the words “Special limited edition lo-fi delay prototype for Alex Clay”. On the inside was a handwritten note from Brian thanking me for all that I have done for the brand, and his signature on the bottom. I was speechless, and could feel my face getting redder and hotter by the minute as all of these emotions started bubbling to the surface. I somehow choked out a “Thank You” as I started tearing up a little bit, and luckily my wife stopped filming before I burst into tears of elation. I was beyond floored and couldn’t focus the rest of the day. I found out later after talking to Jason that he reached out to my wife and wanted to do it as a thank you and to celebrate my kidney making it to one year post-transplant. I think I told Brian and Jason and the team “Thank You” at least 1,000 times, and it still doesn’t seem like enough to this day. I plugged the proto in and it was EXACTLY what I was hearing on the Wheelhouse album. I’m still in shock thinking about it, and it is one of the kindest and heartwarming gifts I’ve ever received, and I’m eternally grateful to call Jason and Brian and everyone at Wampler close friends.

As the year carried on, I continued working with Jason, with him allowing me to help “reveal” some new product photos for new releases and helping to share the news of impending releases. Mid-June came along and with it a conversation with Brian that would set into motion things I had only dreamt about...

Gain Stacking – 101

When it comes to pedals, there are endless possibilities of combinations to create the perfect tone for the scenario that you’re in, whether it’s just jamming at home with a jam track or in a live band setting in front of a packed venue.

One secret to finding that elusive perfect tone is to use two dirt pedals stacked together to cascade your gain structure instead of just running a single drive pedal with the gain all of the way up, or running a dirt pedal into a cranked amp. There are several advantages to doing this, including extra control of the nuances of your EQ to how the gain reacts in terms of the bloom of the notes. Here are a few tips when configuring your stacking setup to maximize tone:

  • When stacking 2 dirt pedals together, the key thing to remember is that the 2ndpedal in the chain dictates the overall tone of the stack. What does this mean? Let’s use a tubescreamer and the Plexi Drive (JTM-45 style overdrive) as examples. If you run the TS before the Plexi Drive, whatever signal is leaving the TS is going to use the Plexi as a “gateway” of sorts. This means that the EQ and the clipping on the Plexi Drive will change the way the TS sounds. By nature the TS is mid-heavy, which is great for cutting through the mix. Once it reaches the Plexi Drive, the circuit itself will take that signal and adjust the frequencies it sees according to the knob position treble and gain positions. So if you have the mid hump from the TS, but have the natural light mid-cut from the Plexi Drive, that mid-hump will be less pronounced and the gain will just add to the overall level of saturation. This will give your gain a larger, “wall of sound” effect, while placing the TS AFTER the Plexi Drive, the TS will impart that more noticeable inherent mid-hump. If you have a favorite pedal that you like as your “base tone”, you’lll either want to put that last, or put a very transparent boost (even just a clean boost) after it.
  • Cranking the volume on the first pedal in the stack will not raise the volume, but will increase the clipping (gain) in the second pedal. When stacking 2 pedals, remember that volume before dirt = more gain, where volume after dirt = more volume. Again, the 2nd pedal acts as a “gate” and dictates the overall volume. Cranking the output of the first pedal will push the input higher and clip the signal harder. This will make a big difference, because if you want a volume boost for a solo, you’ll want to put it 2nd in the stack.
  • Using an EQ pedal after your drives can help better sculpt your dirt tones. When you add an EQ pedal into the stacking equation, your options open up tremendously, especially based on what EQ pedal you’re using. We live in the golden age of effects pedals, so there are loads of great EQ’s out there, some that just adjust basic 3-band EQ (Bass, Mids, Treble) and there are some that let you fine tune the exact frequency of the signal to add or cut whatever you want in your tone. Getting lost in the mix using a big muff? Crank up the mids a bit. Want a little bit of added depth in a smaller venue? Adjust up the bass frequencies to fill out the sonic canvas. This also applies when using the amp for dirt, by sticking the EQ pedal into the FX loop of your amp, then you have access to a boost and can adjust your amps gain tone to the closest detail to get that perfect tone.
  • Stacking dirt pedals into an already distorted amp can add a depth and level of saturation to your tone only capable from stacking. Players have been using this method for decades to achieve their signature tones on classic records. A favorite of many people has always been a Plexi paired with a TS, which is used to boost the mids for solos. Another stack that happens often is using a Fender amp on the edge of break-up, and a Klon-style boost/OD to kick it into the stratosphere. One of the most popular and widely known stacks revolves around running a cranked fuzz face into most any type of amp (especially Plexi-style amps). The fuzz face provides a thick, wall of sound that’s great for fat sustaining leads or for chunky rhythms.

The main thing to remember is there are no wrong ways to stack your gain! Some of the most surprising stacks may lead to the coolest tones. Don’t be afraid to experiment and create unique combinations that can fit any scenario you need, from two low-gain drives to provide a base tone that you can stack on more gain for solos, or a boost hitting a distortion for sustain and saturation galore.

A few fun Wampler-related stacks that work really well together:

  • Tumnus into the Pinnacle Distortion. It adds a low-mid presence that just punches through the mix and sustains for days.
  • Clarksdale into the Plexi Drive. Reminiscent of cranked Plexi tones that have an added presence and depth from the EQ shape on the Clarksdale
  • Velvet Fuzz into Plexi Deluxe.From tube driver-esque tones to full on Hendrix, this is the go-to combo for great classic fuzzy blues.
  • Tumnus into the Euphoria. The perfect yin and yang. The Euphoria sounds like your amps natural OD with a D-style amp feel, and the Tumnus’s low-mid presence and warmth creates a 3D tone that works for a plethora of styles of music.

There are a lot more out there. What are some of your favorite stacks?

Breaking out the Pentatonic, Pt 4

Lesson 3: The Harmonic Minor Pentatonic

Breaking out of the pentatonic boxes doesn’t mean that you have to totally change the way you play guitar and start all over again, in fact, it’s very much the opposite! It simply means that you use your pentatonic knowledge as the foundation to build a more varied library of ideas.

In this lesson we will be taking the minor pentatonic shape 1 and changing one simple element to create a whole new sound and scale shape. We draw inspiration from the darker sounding harmonic minor scale and replace the flattened 7th we normally use with the natural seventh. Before we get deep into theory, the scale shape looks like this:

The Theory

To create this scale we firstly worked out the harmonic minor scale, which looks like this

Harmonic Minor 

1st, 2nd, b3rd, 4th, 5th, b6th, 7th

The key difference between this scale and the natural minor scale is the 7th (which is b7th in the natural minor). Therefore, our concept is to take the minor pentatonic and replace the b7th with the 7th to create the ‘harmonic minor pentatonic!’<

Harmonic minor pentatonic 

1st, b3rd, 5th, b6th, 7th

This scale can be used over basic minor progressions, but be careful to use the 7th degree as a tension note, resolving quickly to the root or b6th. You can also use the scale over a harmonic minor backing track, which uses the notes of the harmonic minor scale to harmonise the chords. Basic examples of this would be to use a major chord on the 5 chord, rather than minor. For example, you could play Am to E major and use your A harmonic minor pentatonic perfectly over that. Have some fun experimenting with it!

More about Your Guitar Academy!

Your Guitar Academy is the UK’s central hub for learning guitar. They offer an online subscription-based range guitar lessons called “YGA Pro”, as well as private guitar tuition in several parts of the UK including London. They welcome students of all ages and abilities looking to learn and improve, from complete beginners to experienced players. They’d love to hear from you!

Breaking out the Pentatonic - Pt 3

Lesson 3: One String Pentatonic

Breaking out of the pentatonic boxes doesn’t mean that you have to totally change the way you play guitar and start all over again, in fact, it’s very much the opposite! It simply means that you use your pentatonic knowledge as the foundation to build a more varied library of ideas.

In this lesson we come at the idea from a different angle altogether! This time we are not altering notes or adding arpeggios, we are sticking with the same 5 note pentatonic scale as always, except playing it on one string! This idea opens up a totally different, more vocal, sound to the scale. To begin with here is the A minor pentatonic scale on the G string...

Your first task is to get to know this across the neck. Remember to try and visualise the 5 pentatonic shapes as you flow through them on this one string. A great exercise is to get someone to shout ‘stop’ as you go through the notes… wherever you land you should be able to play up and down the pentatonic full box, wether it’s box 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5! Once you’ve got that you can work on the technique.

 

Slides and Vibrato

To get the notes sounding almost vocal like, you need to apply some simple techniques. Start by using grace note slides. This is simply where you quickly slide from note to note, so that the note covers one beat, not two (see the video for more help). If you then apply some wide vibrato you will immediately have this more fluid, vocal sound. Here is a cool exercise to practice this:

This can take a while to perfect, but once you’ve nailed it on one string try to do it on another string in the same key, followed by actually changing key. Good luck!

More about Your Guitar Academy!

Your Guitar Academy is the UK’s central hub for learning guitar. They offer an online subscription-based range guitar lessons called “YGA Pro”, as well as private guitar tuition in several parts of the UK including London. They welcome students of all ages and abilities looking to learn and improve, from complete beginners to experienced players. They’d love to hear from you!

Another Free lesson!

Lesson 2: The Major / Minor Pentatonic

Breaking out of the pentatonic boxes doesn’t mean that you have to totally change the way you play guitar and start all over again, in fact, it’s very much the opposite! It simply means that you use your pentatonic knowledge as the foundation to build a more varied library of ideas. 

In this lesson we will be taking the minor pentatonic shape 1 and changing one simple element to create a whole new sound and scale shape. We take the b3rd of the scale and sharpen to create a natural third instead. This essentially means that we have brought in a major element to the minor pentatonic scale, hence the name major / minor pentatonic. There are two ways to play this shape, which you can see here:

The Theory

In terms of how to use this scale, we need to understand a simple bit of theory. This scale uses the following notes:

Scale Construction

1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, b7th 

Within these notes we have major and minor elements. The root, 4th and 5th are all good in both major and minor, but the 3rd is major and the b7th is minor. Therefore the ideal chord and sound to use this scale is shape is a dominant chord. If you look at the chord construction of a dominant 7th chord you get this:

Dominant 7th chord

1st, 3rd, 5th, b7th

 So this works perfectly! As it works so well over the dominant 7th chord this scale is perfect for blues and funk, so jam away to those style backing tracks. If you are playing over a 12 bar blues, remember that this scale fits perfectly over the root chord, but not as well over the there chords… so just tread lightly as the track progresses!

More about Your Guitar Academy!

Your Guitar Academy is the UK’s central hub for learning guitar. They offer an online subscription-based range guitar lessons called “YGA Pro”, as well as private guitar tuition in several parts of the UK including London. They welcome students of all ages and abilities looking to learn and improve, from complete beginners to experienced players. They’d love to hear from you!

Free lessons!

Lesson 1: The m7b5 Arpeggio...

Breaking out of the pentatonic boxes doesn’t mean that you have to totally change the way you play guitar and start all over again, in fact, it’s very much the opposite! It simply means that you use your pentatonic knowledge as the foundation to build a more varied library of ideas.

In this lesson we will be taking the C#m7b5 arpeggio (a half diminished arpeggio) and add it to the pentatonic box 2. We’ll get into the theory in a minute, first of all, let’s learn the shape:

Our second task is to layer this new shape on top of the B minor pentatonic shape 2. Theory aside for the moment, this layering effect will allow us to quickly call upon the m7b5 arpeggio without having to think too hard about it! The little exercise we looked at in the video is as follows:

Tab for arpeggio

The Theory

So, for those of you who like to know what’s going on behind the scenes, let’s talk about the theory behind this concept. We are using the key of B minor for now. If you are a pentatonic player you probably know that if someone shouts B minor, you pop your first shape of the pentatonic on the fretboard on the 7th fret and away you go! Well, thew other thing that happens when the key is called is that you can harmonise the B minor scale to create a series of 7 chord shapes. These are <em>B minor, C#m7b5, D major, E minor, F# minor, G major, A major and finally back to B minor</em>. Each one of these chords uses only the notes from B minor to create the chord, and therefore they work perfectly together in key.

All we are doing is taking one of these chords (we could take any), in this case the C#m7b5, and playing through it over the B minor backing track. We know every note will work as the notes are built from the B minor scale. The cool effect you get is that of a bit of tension, as these notes spell out a chord that may not be playing underneath (unless you beautifully land it on the correct chord). This could be a bit dodgy sounding if you just keep going up and down it, but used conservatively and resolving to the pentatonics after each lick, provides a cool sound that adds a bit more spice to your playing and gets you out of those pentatonic boxes, even just for a moment!

More about Your Guitar Academy!

Your Guitar Academy is the UK’s central hub for learning guitar. They offer an online subscription-based range guitar lessons called “YGA Pro”, as well as private guitar tuition in several parts of the UK including London. They welcome students of all ages and abilities looking to learn and improve, from complete beginners to experienced players. They’d love to hear from you!

Your Tone Knob...

When you think of tone, what comes to mind? For me it is all encompassing, from the wood the guitar is made of, the pickups, what type of wiring is setup, the string brand and gauge, to the cables, to each pedal and what it does to the signal, the pre-amp and power amp, the speaker, the wood that the speaker cab is made up. For me tone is the culmination of the effort you’ve put into selecting each part of your signal chain, and factoring in the tonality of your individual playing style and how it reacts to different gear.

I’m also 30 and a total gear nerd, and I love that stuff. My thought processes have changed over the years. When I was 15 and learning and playing punk rock and Red Hot Chili Peppers, Rage Against The Machine and Incubus covers, my friends and I always had the same frame of mind: Hottest pickups and amps you could get in your hands, and ALL KNOBS ON 10! Our guitar volume was either on 10 or 0, and there was no in-between unless by accident. At that point we didn’t even see the need to have a tone knob, because it was never below 10 (and we dreamt of custom guitars that included no tone knobs, just volume). This served me well for many years until I grew up some and learned the subtle differences just those two knobs make on you overall sound and some of the amazing tones you can get by adjusting them in small increments.

Today, I set my amps pretty neutral EQ-wise to be pedal-friendly, except for the fact that I add a touch of extra treble and cut the mids a bit to use pedals and my guitar to fill in those tone frequencies. I normally roll the tone knob back on my guitar to about 7.5-8 depending on the guitar at all times (more with Tele’s than my Les Paul), reserving that extra bit of top end for when I really need to get out front in a hurry, or if I’m in the middle of playing and it sounds too muddy I’ll roll it up without having to change anything other than my guitars. This works on the other viewpoint as well, so if I’m changing guitars and something is too bright (my Strat bridge pickup) I will roll it down a bit more. That’s how I approach the tone knob when playing personally, but it’s definitely not a hard fast rule.

When talking with Brian and Jason, they both still keep their tone knobs on 10 and never roll them down, though they do use their volume knobs pretty heavily. How do you use the Tone knob on your guitars?

For the sake of discussion, here’s Joe Bonamassa discussing how he uses the knobs. He forgot to add that the interaction with the pedals is a thing of tonal beauty as well:

Delays.... the more the merrier… maybe?

I’ll be the first to admit it, I’m a GAS addict. That’s the lovely acronym for what we lovingly call the addiction that is Gear Acquisition Syndrome. I love trying new gear and getting my feet wet when it comes to everything out there. I just love to experiment and soak up the tones of all of the different offerings on the market. Two things in particular that are my main focal points for frequent GAS attacks are Fuzzes and DELAYS. Fuzz is a whole other topic that is left to another blog (there’s so many different styles that I could probably take up several blogs gushing about the glory that are all things fuzz pedals. Delays on the other hand are the stuff that dreams are made of. There are multiple sounds you can achieve with delays that aside from some reverbs (which technically are a form of delay) you can’t replicate using any other effect.

A good friend and I were discussing delay’s the other day, and it’s amazing the number of delays that came up in the conversation that we each believed to be fantastic, whether we had both played the same unit or we compare and trade delays so we can test them out. The question arose between us as to whether you can have too many delays? We both quickly said “NO!” and moved on. Upon thinking about it for a longer period and experimenting with different delays, I came to the conclusion that there’s really no set rule on it, it’s all based on your moods and what you’re going for.

Looking at some of the main delay uses that many players would have a delay for (slapback, added depth for a solo, rhythmic dotted 8th’s, ambient and dreamy melodies, and then oscillation off of the top of my head that I use right off hand) I came to the realization that with one great quality delay pedal that you can hit most if not all of those categories. It made me want to downsize my rig (from pictured at the top of the page) to a much more condensed board with just essentials to push myself.

At the same time, GAS had me fighting the idea of taking pedals off of my board. I quickly started weighing the pros and cons and alternatives and these were what came to mind:

 

Pros of Multiple Delays:

  • Quick and Easy – If I have more than one delay then I can set and forget them for my most common used delay settings and just kick them on when I’m ready. This is vital when changing songs or to other parts of a song because the settings are ready and you don’t have to fool with twisting knobs.
  • Broader Coverage – By having different delays on your pedalboard, you can pick and choose varying flavors of delay to cover a broad spectrum of tones. You could pair a digital delay for dotted 8th notes with a warm analog delay for a great warm slapback, or a EP3 style pedal with a really warm preamp for solos with an ambient delay (with reverb even…Ethereal anyone?). The choices are endless in terms of mixing and matching delay types and sounds.
  • Experimentation – Just like the previous part mentioned covering a lot of tones, you can mix those two delays with oscillation or dotted 8ths with triplets for a wall of sound. Stacking pedals is half of the fun, and the combinations can get really wild.

 

Cons:

  • Pedalboard Space – This is the biggie. Multiple delays means taking up extra spots on your board that either require you to give up other pedals to fit on there, or requiring a bigger board. Bigger board means more weight and more to deal with. Power can also be a big issue. If you power source is maxed out, then comes the struggle of figuring out how you’re going to power the extra pedal(s). Daisy-chaining delays is typically a no-no due to noise, so there’s that too.
  • Knob Twiddling – Another main part is that with more pedals comes more tweaking, which can really detract from playing. I’ve spent many hours endlessly tweaking when I should have just plugged my Faux Tape Echo (my personal favorite delay) in and spent the time PRACTICING. I’m guilty of tweaking way too many settings because I want it how it sounds in my head. I can usually find it quickly once I’m familiar with a delay, but until that point it takes more time.
  • COST – Pedals are expensive! Granted not as expensive as guitars or amps, but with several pedals you can buy a nice guitar or amp (or in some cases and decent car).

Multi-Effects

These are in their own category in itself because of the array of units and functionality out there. There are pros and cons to them along with multiple delays. They are usually very convenient because they’re completely loaded with various parameters and algorithms to tweak for nearly any delay style you can imagine. The appeal of such a pedal in one unit is hard to beat. That being said, they’re typically quite expensive and then you have what you have. They typically have banks of presets to choose from, but in a gig situation they aren’t always the easiest to tweak if you need to. At the same time, you have a boat load of options right there while only taking up a bit of room.

 

What are your thoughts? How many delays are enough? Will one suffice, or do you prefer multiple delays, or all-in-one units for complete tweakability? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.