Well, I’ve just one of the best weeks I can remember for a long time!

As you probably already know, I play in what bDub calls a “Dad-Rock” cover band and love every damn second of it. If I am honest, we are OK, we are tight and we always have good tone – we play the kind of music that would get us booted out of any US bar but over here, that kind of Americana/Blues/Country stuff is quite rare so we, at least around here, quite different to most other bands on the circuit. I’ve known all the guys I play with for almost 30 years and have been playing with them on and off for that time, although it was only a couple of years ago I fully joined them after the guitarist (the first guitar player I ever saw play live – albeit in a different band -  in early 1988) unexpectedly had to quit the band after being there for 24 years. So… it’s not a serious musical adventure, it’s just some old friends who get on very well playing the kind of music they like to the best of their ability. The band, Dirty Money, is somewhat of an institution around these here parts. On Sunday we played in the afternoon, outside (in the last hurrah of the flailing UK summer) a lovely time was had by all – it was just a laid-back moment of loveliness that we all thoroughly enjoyed. I must admit, I like afternoon gigs as it means I’m home by 9 and can get a decent night’s sleep. 2am and I just don’t mix like we used too. 

Then… Monday. Well, you may have read my last blog piece about it we saw the unbelievably perfect Joey Landreth. You can read about it here.

On Tuesday we were off again to see one of my favourite musicians, Mr Adrian Legg. Now, I have history with Adrian, I first saw him supporting Joe Satriani in March 1993 (the concert that provided the live track “Flying In A Blue Dream” for the album Time Machine) and for me, Adrian completely and utterly stole the show that night. You can picture it, lots of long-haired rock guitar god types all going to see ‘the master’ and in support is this wonderfully quietly spoken man with just an Ovation guitar. As he walked out we all kinda went “What the…?” but within the first 4 bars, the entire venue had their jaws on the floor in stunned disbelief what they were seeing. As we left the show that night, all around me all I could hear was talk about Adrian. I mean, everyone was blown away by Joe, but I’m pretty certain Adrian picked up a lot of fans that tour (he then went on to do a G3 tour with Joe and Vai) and I quietly just bought all his albums and retained my level of fandom over the years, I was delighted to connect with Adrian when the social media explosion happened and we often (and still do) talk about gear. He’s one of our artists in the most lovely way, he only uses stuff he likes that can make him sound incredible, and he still sound incredible - it’s so cool to see one of my favourite players sporting a Tumnus to make his acoustic guitar bite and growl in the perfect way. About an hour from us a small club run by a certain Mr and Mrs Quayle (who have a son you might be familiar with. Let’s just say… they created a Dual Fusion of their own), and they occasionally have some really good players performing so we go on up when we can. It was lovely to see Adrian again, not seen him for a couple of years and he honoured me by playing a request that I had asked for – “Mrs Jacks Last Stand” that is just one of the most beautiful pieces of solo guitar I can think of.

Adrian often tours the US, you can find tickets here. if you get the chance, you’d be mad not to go. It was a very, very, very special night for all concerned (this was the first time I could take Lisa with me so she was delighted to finally meet Adrian, Richard and Leslie - Tom’s Mum and Dad – in the flesh. You gotta love Leslie, she often starts a sentence with “Oh, I shouldn’t tell you this but there was this one time, when he younger, that Thomas…” and BOOM, there is my material for the next NAMM flight to wind him up!)

A couple of days followed that was just work and family stuff and then on Friday, we were off out again to see an exceptionally cool and fast-rising star named Kris Barras. Man. I wish you could have seen it. I’m not the biggest blues fan in the world, as a lot of it just gets repetitive after a while, but there are certain bands and players that take the mould and smash it to a million pieces, all the time retaining the core of what makes a great blues band. Kris, quite simply, is a phenomenal player. I was listening intently all night as I kept hear different styles flawlessly fall from his fingers… it was about halfway through I suddenly realised what was happening. Every time he changed guitars, his playing slightly changed with it – but not completely, just another version of him. I’ve never really seen that in a player before. You know what it’s like, when someone plays a different guitar they tend to be the exact same player just with a slightly different tone with a couple of specific tricks thrown in… but Kris was actually adapting his style and voicings to compliment his guitar which was a real mind bend for me. When he was on the Tele, some incredibly subtle yet perfectly placed country fills were coming out right alongside some more biting bluesy stuff, then when we went to the Strat, the attack changed, as did the note choice, as did the feel of his playing… same when he went to his HB equipped guitars (a PRS and Seth Baccus Nautilus) everything changed again… I think I could tell you what guitar he was playing ‘now’  (in a blindfold test) on any given gig not by the tone, but how he changes his playing. I really wish I could articulate this better as it’s probably reading like a nonsense but within his own unique style, I could hear Gary Moore, The Allmans, Brent Mason, Albert Lee, Skynyrd, Mr BB (The) King, JoBo, Derek Trucks, Clapton, Beck… the list is endless, but each of those influences came out, perfectly morphed into his own style, according to the instrument he was playing. Class.

Then, after seeing those three incredible players during the week, three players that are respectively either at the sitting at the top of their genre, or comfortable in the fact that they changed millions of players and can still shake them to this day or one that’s raising up so fast it’s hard to keep up with them… All these players inspire me to be the best I possibly can… on Saturday night, I took Lisa to see her favourite guitar player play live, fortunately for me, that actually is me… and that’s just about the best feeling in the world for this hapless romantic old fool.

 

Once again, last night, I had the distinct pleasure of seeing quite possibly my favourite guitarist perform at close quarters… Mr Joey Landreth.

I know, ask me tomorrow and my favourite will be someone else, but right now the endless carousel of my ‘favourites’ is quite often leaning more towards Joey than other players. It may be a phase I’m going through, it may not be, but if it is a phase, it’s one that’s been going on for a couple of years now and I can’t see it stopping anytime soon.

Those who’ve not heard me talk about Joey before here is the obligatory backstory… I met him by chance a couple of NAMM’s ago when I was out partaking in a ‘couple of beers’ with the legend that is Andy Wood (insert name drop horn here) and he introduced me to “my man Joey”… It was dark and noisy in the bar so I turned to Andy and said “Is that Joey f$%&ing Landreth?” and he laughed and said “Yes sir!”. I proceeded to talk at Joey for about an hour and have since been to see him here in the UK every chance I get…  And he never, ever disappoints.

Fortunately for us over here it’s never very far to travel to see great music, I live at the arse end of nowhere so people rarely come down this far, but in about an hour or so I can see great music (although truth be known, I hate travelling anywhere so I’m in grumpy mode when the tickets are released and they don’t come down here… but, moving swiftly on)… The venue was small, busy… standing room only – I would say no more than 140 people all packed in like a tightly packed box of Lego. I looked around the room and noticed 6 ‘That Pedal Show’, 4 ‘Fender’, 1 ‘Gibson’ and 2 ‘PRS’ shirts on display… Yep, the place was full of guitar players. Fortunately, we had arrived early so I got a small chance to catch up with Joey before the first act, who Joey described as “My drummer, Roman”… so, we thought that would be interesting, as I’ve never seen a drummer as a support act. Roman is not just a drummer. He is so much more. Sitting behind a piano we were treated to some masterful playing and a voice that was outstanding. High in register, so not only perfect for harmonies but on his own was the kind of voice that was absolutely mesmerizing. I would say Roman is picking up a lot of new fans on this tour, including us.

I’m sitting here trying to find superlatives about Joey and the band (Roman Clarke on drums and Meg Dolovich on bass) and I’m trying my hardest to not sound sycophantic, or overtly gushing, but there are times when you see an artist who is not at the start of their career, but most certainly still very much on the ascent, and you just know you are in the presence of something extremely special. I get the feeling that providing ‘this’ carries on as it already is, Joey Landreth will be held at the highest esteem by the wider population as he already is by the fanatical fans that are already following him.

I guess you are wondering why I am writing about this - as Joey is not one of our artists, he doesn’t use our gear but to be honest, you could say this is about me wanting to make as many people as possible aware of this monumental talent so you can see him now before the only chance you get is at festivals or bigger gigs. But, this piece is more about the guy we took up to the gig, a young musician from the small town I live in that I’ve been aware of for a while, just a name I knew from kids at the school and the small community we live in – although I was aware of him, we’d never met and not spoken to before.

He, Jake, contacted me through Facebook as he was desperate to get to the gig – he’d got himself a ticket and failed in his efforts to get his Dad to take him up – so he contacted me to ask if he could come up with us (myself and Lisa, my wife) - we said “Sure” but at the same time, feeling kinda weird as we were not knowing what to expect. I mean, we are both in our mid 40’s and the thought of spending around 3 hours in the car with a college kid in his late teens… what do we talk about? In the first few minutes he managed to blow away any worries I had as he was everything you expect an atypical teenager not to be. He is an articulate tone chaser, works like an animal in his job (He’s also in college studying music production) in order to buy the gear he GAS’s for, is exceptionally well read on gear, experienced in everything and could easily talk for hours on end about pickups, pedals, guitars, amps, valves and just about everything else related to gear. Also, from the videos I’ve seen he’s a great player and great singer. When you spend as much time as the marketing side of this business as I do you sometimes notice the divisions in the customer base and quite often a lot of the younger gearheads are very focused in their views, opinionated towards certain styles of music and the gear associated with them, but he was – is – an open book. Only interested in one thing – the quality of the product. Whether that be gear or what is going into his ears in terms of music, as long as it’s good, he’s good with it. Obviously, he leans in a certain direction with his musical tastes, but the way he was talking about old and new music alike, across many genres, was fantastic. He approaches music and gear with a wide-eyed wonderment that is so rare to see these days in anyone, let alone a teenager. So, those who knock millennials can think again as there are great young musicians out there who work hard for their craft and are so respectful for the wider aspect of the industry and the results of it… People like him give me a great feeling for the future of music and the guitar.

Back to Joey Landreth… had to happen really. What can I say, other than open up Spotify and listen to his music. If he’s playing anywhere near you, cancel whatever you have planned and go and see him. You won’t regret it. Joey is a man of such musical beauty you will walk away from the gig in a better place than when you entered. If you take the time to get in line and get to talk with him as well, you will probably walk away thinking either: 1: You wish you were married to him; 2: You wish your daughter was married to him; 3: You were him; or at the very least, 4: You had one of the four things he has in abundance… a rare talent for singing, a rare talent for playing the guitar, a rare talent for songwriting, and a rare talent for being the coolest and straight up nicest guy on the planet.

To be honest, if I didn’t love the man so much I’d probably be obliged to hate him for any one of those reasons listed above.

Anyway, enough about all this. This week I’m also off to see Adrian Legg, the acoustic master who can terrify any player from a distance of 100 yards and Kris Barras, the most exciting young blues player the UK has spawned since Matt Schofield (who was there last night who I walked straight into and exclaimed at high volume with much vulgar surprise something along the lines of “Good golly gosh, you’re that Matt Schofield chap aren’t you?” - but slightly more to the point).

Yeah, it’s a good week to be me. Here is a small clip of last night, I would have filmed more, but I didn't want to watch him on my phone, I wanted to see it all properly.